Portsmouth Trust looking at Plan B

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Re: Portsmouth Trust looking at Plan B

Post  Wandering on Fri Feb 08, 2013 6:20 am

Really interesting development with Portsmouth yesterday - If the Club fail to leave administration by the end of the season and the Supporters Trust are forced to form a new club, they could potentially be playing in the Southern League Premier Division next year!!

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At its meeting in London earlier today, the Board of The Football League was appraised of the current situation regarding the administration of Portsmouth Football Club in light of media reports that the Administrator, PKF, is considering a new offer for the Club. The League had previously been informed by PKF that its preferred bid for the Club was from the Pompey Supporters Trust (PST) and all parties have been focussed on a successful transfer of share to that consortium.

Given that The Football League’s Insolvency Policy prohibits a club from beginning two consecutive seasons in administration, the Board took the view that any change of preferred bidder at such a late stage would only create further uncertainty and was not in the wider interests of The League and its member clubs.Therefore, The League has informed the Administrator that it will not currently consider transferring the Club’s share in The Football League to a new bidder. This means that in the event that the PST bid does not succeed and Portsmouth do not exit administration before the end of the current playing season, the Club will lose its membership of The Football League.

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Re: Portsmouth Trust looking at Plan B

Post  Harry Swift on Wed Apr 10, 2013 5:05 pm

PRESS RELEASE

Pompey in the hands of the fans


Portsmouth FC are to become the biggest community owned club in Britain following the resolution of the case brought by the Club’s administrator, Trevor Birch, today in the High Court in London, over the sale of Fratton Park.

The deal, which means that Fratton Park can now be sold to the Club, removes the final hurdle which has seen fans of the Club pledge funds to a Pompey Supporters Trust Community Share Issue, and which will result in majority ownership by the Trust. They now have a further year to purchase as many shares as they can.

Kevin Rye, spokesman for Supporters Direct, said:

“This is of course a fantastic day for the supporters’ trust movement, and we think something that football should celebrate as well. The work that went into making this possible is extraordinary, and I don’t think its significance can be underplayed. However what has made this possible at its heart, beyond anything that any one single individual or organisation did alone, is that the fans of the club, and the community of the City of Portsmouth, united to ensure that their club can now be in the hands of the people who sustain it”
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Re: Portsmouth Trust looking at Plan B

Post  Harry Swift on Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:55 pm

The Last Word: Margaret Thatcher treated them all as a disease. Now football fans are the cure

What has happened at Portsmouth must become the model for club ownership – supporters rule

Michael Calvin
Independent
Sunday 14 April 2013


In an immortal moment of clarity, François Mitterand, the former French president, suggested Margaret Thatcher had "the eyes of Caligula". On this particular summer morning, in a first-floor meeting room at 10 Downing Street, those eyes bored into the back of our skulls.

They reflected her chilling certainty and possessed their own gravitational field. We were a confection of commentators who had been summoned, following the Heysel disaster, to offer observations and possible solutions to the scourge of football hooliganism.

A prime minister at the height of her powers, she went around the large walnut table canvassing opinions she was predisposed to ignore. She thanked us with a smile, which snapped shut like a carnivorous plant, and swept away, ministers and mandarins trailing in her wake.

The dark ages beckoned. The ultimate conviction politician had decided football supporters were a social disease, a blight to be eradicated. They were the enemy within, second-class citizens who had forfeited their right to trust, decency and respect. They were to be lied to and put upon.

In a sense, the revisionist nonsense that Mrs Thatcher was football's saviour is an irrelevance. The Spitting Image puppets, Graham Kelly, David Mellor and Colin Moynihan, are already back in the attic. The bumbling football administrator, caricature football activist and Olympian boy scout are historical artefacts.

The future belongs to the sort of people who, in a different time, were traduced as the dregs of society. Football fans may still be subjected to disrespect and injustice, but they have a significant opportunity to contribute to a game which seems determined to grow away from its natural constituency.

It has been a momentous week. All four Champions' League semi-finalists are, in theory at least, owned by supporters. Portsmouth fans have driven the money-changers out of Fratton Park, that rather dowdy temple where ancient advertisements under the main stand promote seats for five shillings and sixpence.

There is a new plaque at the mock-Tudor entrance to the ground which reads: "On this site once more stands a mighty football club. We cannot change the past but we can shape the future." It is dedicated to "all those fans who took a stand and refused to allow Portsmouth FC to die".

Their success was instructive, even though the names of key characters such as Iain McInnes, Ashley Brown, Mick Williams, Mark Trapani, Bob Beech and Micah Hall will probably not register. Pompey's Supporters Trust have paid just over £3 million to own 51 per cent of a club who hope to re-emerge from administration next Friday.

The Football League, whose leadership in consistently spurning the opportunistic interventions of the financier Keith Harris was exemplary, will confirm relegation by imposing an immediate 10-point penalty. Life can begin again in League Two next season. A chief executive, Mark Catlin, has been appointed, and Guy Whittingham is likely to be confirmed as manager. The solidarity shown by supporters during the process of renewal is more significant. Representatives of fans from more than 30 clubs have contacted Portsmouth since their High Court victory on Wednesday. They will seek guidance, and inspiration, from their peers.

Problems will persist. The bigger clubs, with their fictional attendances and corporate fixations, will get bigger. The institutionalised inequality of TV revenue means a two-tier Premier League, featuring between 32 and 36 clubs, is likely to be operating before the end of this decade. A different model will evolve.

Supporters' trusts are ideally equipped to be the lifeline for those beyond the bubble of football tourism, in places like Bury, whose penury is by no means unique. A counter- culture will evolve. Clubs will need to become more proactive in the community, more responsive to their customers. They will be run by the right people, in the right way, for the right reasons.

Rejoice, as someone once said on the steps of 10 Downing Street.

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/f...e-8572208.html
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Re: Portsmouth Trust looking at Plan B

Post  Harry Swift on Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:53 pm

The fan takeover of Portsmouth FC should be welcomed by supporters of all clubs

By Guest | Published: April 17, 2013


Kevin Rye is a spokesperson for Supporters Direct

As we now know, following a successful legal battle over Portsmouth’s Fratton Park last week, the way was cleared for the Pompey Supporters Trust to finalise their purchase of the majority of the Club, which will make it the biggest supporters owned club in the UK.

Almost immediately, the doubters began to emerge, telling us that the chances of fans being able to make a success of a club of this size was simply wishful thinking. Great at repairing short-term damage, but if you want to rise back to the heady-heights of the Premier League again then forget it.

To take the phrase used by Pompey’s administrator Trevor Birch out of context, “It needs some TLC”. As someone said last week, “It’s only for the small clubs, the non-league clubs. The Club will need investment to achieve get back to where it belongs”.

So many elements of this way of thinking are wrong. The implicit assumption that the first thing that the owners of any club should be doing is going all out for a return to the top – much less the owners of a Club upon whom was visited more tragedy than most clubs would suffer in a lifetime, let alone a few years – is misguided at best. That way lies madness.

We’ve been misled

We’ve traditionally been fed a lie by some people in the game that what we as fans want is success at breakneck speed, or nothing else, and I think that’s the laziest of the lot: given a choice, I don’t think most of us do. Don’t get me wrong, I want success, but I don’t want it at the cost of the ground, the club – its soul. We were told Chelsea fans didn’t care, yet the Chelsea Supporters Trust lives.

Let’s have a look at that little word ‘investment’ as well. When we talk about investment in public services what we want is to see the tangible results of money – that our experience is improved, that care is of a high-quality, that our kids are better educated.

Yet in football we’re told that investment means barely anything other than wages – and of course, player wages. In fact, ‘investment’ invariably means increasing spending beyond what can be afforded by the club on the wage bill. Apart from that being increasingly difficult to do given some of the controls being put in place in the Football League in particular, I would argue there’s also in my mind a clear relationship between the level of ‘investment’ at many clubs, and the heaviness of the crash landing.

Football is about more than just results

We believe investment to mean that you invest in the tangible: in facilities, youth development, community engagement, increasing participation in sport. Ensuring that in running a football club, you understand what, at its heart, makes the business quite so different, and special.

Inside these clubs are fans, a beating heart, a community of people that ensure it survives relegations, and that heading off financial precipices because of bad decisions by short-term focused owners don’t spell the end for a club; that, as a fan, a club is more than just the results on the pitch.

Of course, influence is much easier by definition at a smaller club. Indeed, at virtually the same time that we’ve been witnessing the fruits of our support of the Pompey Trust takeover, we’ve been working with the Friends of Clapton FC ensuring that their Club has a future. But it’s not really about size in the end. It’s about what kind of football club you want.
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Re: Portsmouth Trust looking at Plan B

Post  Harry Swift on Fri Jan 10, 2014 1:29 pm

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Re: Portsmouth Trust looking at Plan B

Post  Harry Swift on Thu Apr 10, 2014 8:05 am

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